FMCG and Consumer Goods recruitment
  • Bbc
    Client
    More Jobs than People?

    ​More jobs than people?Not strictly speaking, however this week, according to the BBC and ONS, it was reported that there were more job vacancies, than there were those seeking a role. Does logic, therefore, suggest that if you want a job there’s one for you?Of course not, and we know that. Operating in our markets, Manufacturing and Automotive, it’s about more than a bum on a seat, our clients have specific requirements and skills they require to remain competitive, efficient and growing. So the skills shortage hasn’t evaporated overnight!There are some encouraging trends. People who have been inactive economically, aged between 16 and 64, are moving into work, and job to job moves have been driven by people resigning from a role, rather than being dismissed or made redundant.However, as we see a rise in inflation, now at 9% (18th May 2022), here at Expion, we see more people than ever before citing an increased salary as a reason to move role. Whilst most people say ‘money isn’t everything’ (and it isn’t), it is becoming more understandable as a justifiable reason for people to seek a new role. We reported in our Market Report in April, 59% of workers said a pay rise is essential to them. If it’s not on offer where they are, it’s a compelling reason to look for a role.And whilst flexible working offers the opportunity for some people to manage commuting costs, it will be interesting to see whether there’s a growth in people’s interest in returning more to the office when fuel costs rise again in October. Shivering on a Teams call is likely to become increasingly unpopular when a fully heated office is available!So when there are more jobs than people, what else can employers do?Benefits can be a big draw. We’re seeing employers offering increased benefits packages, bonuses (including sign-on bonuses), and support for those wishing to gain qualifications. Wellness benefits are also on the rise. 24% of employers in our report said they were offering financial support through information, advice, and online resources, and 13% said they were offering actual financial support to workers.Not all of this is forecast to last. With inflation tipped to hit 10%, and industry stating that prices are continuing to rise, economists have once again mentioned the word ‘recession’. If history is to be repeated, this will mean job losses and a rising unemployment rate.So what does this mean for recruitment? We know that recruitment tends to be one of the first industries to be hit when there’s economic uncertainty, and one of the first to recover. It’s fair to say this has certainly played out over the last 2 years. There’s no sign yet of any slowdown, however, the market is unusually overheated at the moment so any initial slowdown is likely to be more a return to normal rather than alarm bells. But in the meantime, what a market to be in. And this is a market that suits all ‘gens’. From Gen X who are mid-career and want a work-life balance and stability before… (well you know) to tech-savvy millennials in Gen Y, and Gen Z who are much more likely to move roles after a shorter period of time. There are opportunities out there for everyone at the moment, so make the most of them!For more information on how we can support you, get in touch with us via this website, or even give us a call!   

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  • How recruiters use LinkedIn
    Candidate
    How recruiters use LinkedIn

    How recruiters use LinkedIn and why it’s important that you knowRecruiters are notorious for spending a lot of time on LinkedIn. Why wouldn’t they? It’s a smorgasbord of apparent talent, just waiting for a call.Or is it? If it was that easy, we’d fill all our roles in days, let alone weeks. But if you’re new to the industry, not quite grappled LinkedIn or you’re starting to job search a little more than just being a ‘passive candidate’, here’s what you need to know about how we use the platform, and how you could benefit.Most recruiters spend a lot of money working with LinkedIn. Our primary output is to identify ways to make money – by finding suitable candidates for our roles and to ruffle our feathers towards potential clients who might want to work with us. Why does it matter to you?Well, if you’d like to be approached about a ‘relevant’ new role by a recruiter, even if you’re not actively looking, we’re assuming you’ll want to be found on LinkedIn. Many placements are made via LinkedIn, and according to The Circular Board ‘87% of recruiters or talent scouts regularly use LinkedIn, so it’s not entirely surprising that it offers over 20 million job openings. According to a study, 122 million LinkedIn users received a job interview, while 35.5 million were hired by someone they met through the site’.Those are some stats, so imagine you’ve been approached about a role with a business you’ve always aspired to work for. How can you be found?How do we find people?Well, apart from the obvious (searching for them) we need to find the most suitable people in our market. LinkedIn has fabulous search capability so the detail we can delve into is immense, but we can only search into what’s actually there. So, if you don’t populate your profile with up-to-date, relevant information, we might not find you. We can search by qualifications, degree subject, and even year of graduation. Throw in alongside that job title, employer, industry, location, and even keywords. And with global talent pools, if you want to be noticed, you need to get your personal brand up to scratch.A good photo and banner are increasingly important. But that’s the easy stuff. In fact, the external piece around presenting yourself professionally, accurately, and with enough detail is reasonably straightforward. But it’s the hard stuff that makes people stand out.Why do recruiters like well-connected people?Well-connected people are more likely to be active on LinkedIn, respond to messages, contribute to discussions and be receptive to recommendations. Building connections with relevant people make a difference to a recruiter. You’ll have a well-crafted network and it’s easier for us to reach people in that network if you’re well connected and active. Contributing to your network makes you stand out, you’re easier to find and actually, if you’ve seen us active on the platform, you’re more likely to respond if we approach you.How do I know if my profile’s doing well? Watch your profile views. Once you’ve started to be a little more active on LinkedIn, you’ll notice more people start to look at your profile. Is there anyone there you’d like to connect with? If so, request a connection, but add a note as to why. Ask them to support a post you’ve created. LinkedIn loves engagement, so getting likes, and comments in the first couple of hours of posting is essential. When people look at our profiles, we’re curious – is this someone we can help, someone who might be suitable for a current role, or perhaps finding out if we can help with market insight or even a role.Why does content matter?Content is key. Only around 1% of people who are on LinkedIn post content which is why if you do, you’ll stand out quickly. But what to post? You don’t have to write detailed blogs or create lots of graphics. Find someone else’s content that resonates with you and just repost this with a few comments of your own. You can pin this to the featured section of your profile, and create more of a personal brand that will resonate with recruiters and possible future employers.We’re also looking for businessYes, we are. It’s not a secret but being able to approach a possible client cold is hard work, and really not that enjoyable for either party. And I use the word ‘enjoy’ with a hint of sarcasm. It’s horrible. As recruiters, we also get bombarded by ‘sales’ InMails and they’re equally off-putting.But sharing content that is relevant and adds value to the market can bring inbound business. Sharing knowledge (which we think we’re pretty good at) helps others. And whether you use it now or in the future, we hope that we’ve made a difference, and actually, you’ll see some value in talking to us.There’s also much said these days about candidate experience. We’ve talked about this a lot ourselves. In fact, most of our new business comes from candidates who’ve had a good experience with us. Or they’ve consumed some content, worked with our interview coach Liz, or we’ve helped with a CV Critique. All of this builds towards building new business, and if you’re looking for a recruiter to work with, look at their testimonials on LinkedIn or their website to get a feel for what others have experienced. We share our testimonials because we’re proud of them, and also because it shows others we’re just us. Expion.   

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  • Cooperation
    Candidate
    The First 100 Days

    ​The first 100 daysThey say the first 100 days in a new role are the most critical. It’s a term most commonly used for politicians – what will they do, say, deliver? It started with Roosevelt, who achieved much during his first 100 days, it became a barometer for the success of future presidents. Think back to Obama’s inauguration and the pressure to deliver was relentless. It’s also a common measure for people starting in a new role. And it’s not unusual for businesses to ask a candidate at advanced interview stages to prepare and present what they’d do in their first 100 days.So, what do you do?Well, whilst it’s all down to personal preference, the role, and business circumstances, there are some common things ‘to do’ that we see that are widely regarded as beneficial. We talk to candidates after they’ve started and dig into what they’re doing, and how things are going. Where are they achieving success, and how have they gone about it?Here are our thoughts on how to navigate through those first 3 months, and make an impact.Build relationshipsYou have your start date, first-day arrangements and hopefully, your line manager and the team have been in touch during your notice period. But it’s up to you to also make contacts and start to establish yourself before you walk through the door on day 1. Connect with your team, peers, and leaders within the business before you start. If you’re invited to visit to meet the team, have lunch, take it! Making contact early will also prepare them for your arrival and be a supporter of your appointment from the early stages.Make time to answer any questions they might have of you and ask questions of them. This is a golden opportunity to prepare for any upcoming projects or business changes. It’s also a great psychological way of feeling that you’re almost there which can also be helpful if you have a longer notice period.Set expectationsUnderstanding what the expectations are of you is crucial. Get this wrong and you probably won’t be around for long. Spend time with your boss, peers, and others in the business – it’s not just about KPIs, it’s also about upholding the values of the business and fitting in. Chances are, if the recruitment process has been thorough, these shouldn’t be areas that are challenging, just more affirmation of what you already know and believe yourself.Think about what you’re going to say about yourself. Sounds obvious, but you’ll have a lot of intros so making sure you’ve got a concise patter to let people know who you are, what you do, and where you’ve come from will make sure you give a good first impression.Be cautiousListen hard during these first few months. Avoid making judgements and coming to conclusions quickly. There are a lot of things that will have happened in the business or team in the past that you won’t know about, and people react differently to new ideas, team members, and change. Give people a chance, as you’ll want them to for you. According to Paul Wolfe, former SVP at Indeed, writing for Forbes in 2021, “When something is done a certain way, don’t judge. Instead, ask questions to seek understanding. Don’t assume it’s wrong. I find that with new hires, ‘you shouldn’t do it that way’ turns people off. Become part of the team. Respect the work that’s been done to get them there.”Quick winsTry to find some quick wins. Adding value early gives people a great first impression, affords you their time and their ears, and generates goodwill that will ultimately play out as you develop in your role. Many people we’ve spoken to have done just this. From a Factory General Manager who found gaps in financial reports that highlighted big savings, to a Health & Safety Manager who implemented so much change in his first 3 months, his ideas were adopted worldwide to great acclaim.Longer-term ideasThinking longer-term will also cement you more in the business, and people will take you seriously. According to Forbes, ‘You don’t need a team to lead. In the first 30 days keep an eye out for opportunities to lead without yet acting on them. In general, employees who show leadership are more likely to be promoted and less likely to be let go.’And imagining yourself there long-term is good for the soul. We speak to candidates who’ve found themselves having taken the wrong role. It’s uncomfortable and can be painful, and we can spot those who are running for the door. Candidates who have found their place speak differently. They have the mindset to be able to evaluate correctly where they are, where they want to be, and the best path to take.And did you make it?Wolfe states that during the first 100 days, you should have made 2 significant wins. They could be from the plan you created early on, or it could be achieving specific goals or objectives that you’ve been set. Many businesses are now putting in place key milestones for new team members to ensure both parties have met each other’s expectations (remember, it goes both ways), and it’s not uncommon for probation, or a salary rise, to be hinged on certain achievements.Reflecting on the first 100 days can be insightful, and should certainly set you up well for the next hundred, and the next… 

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  • Navigating your notice period
    Candidate
    Navigating your notice period

    Navigating your notice So there. You’ve done it. You’ve resigned from your current role, and you’re in that ‘in-between’ place known as the notice period.Notice periods, along with managers and businesses approach to them varies, so it’s hard to find a one size fits all guide. One thing is for sure though, how you exit a business is as important as how you join, so we always advise, use your time wisely.Here’s some things we’ve seen, heard and been told by our clients and candidates:The resignation conversation. Be clear on your reasons for leaving. Sounds obvious but be concise and to the point. Waffle is rarely your friend, and if the resignation comes as a shock, your line manager is unlikely to listen to all the reasons you’re giving.Be compassionateIf you’re worked for the business or your manager for a long time, there’s a good deal of emotion in this conversation. You’ve had time to prepare, but they won’t have so bear this in mind.You don’t have to let your current employer know where you are going but think about how this might land if you don’t. In some cases, it can be construed as suspicious and even sneaky. If you’re heading to a direct competitor, check your contract if you haven’t already to make sure you’re clear on restrictions you may have to abide by. Ask for clarification from your HR team or line manager if this is the case so you don’t fall foul of any misunderstanding.Counter-offerIf there’s no appetite on your part for a counteroffer, say so to save time and wasted resource. Ask what you can do to support the business during your notice period. Leave a legacy. A ‘How To’ guide for your role can be a good starting point, along with completing any ongoing projects, or handing them over with comprehensive notes. Meet with your manager and colleagues as soon as you can to ensure you’re clear on what they expect from you now you’re moving on. Sounds obvious, but time goes quickly and what can feel like ‘plenty of time’ soon runs into ‘no time at all’.Don’t be upset that you start to get left out of things. The business will be making plans around what to do when you’re gone. They might be restructuring, recruiting, or reallocating work.Give your colleagues some love Chances are they’ll be sorry to see you go and will wish you well. Make them feel appreciated and thanked for the work you’ve done together.You never know when your paths might cross again with people you’ve worked for and with. Never burn a bridge.Some notice periods are lengthy. Some businesses will allow or encourage you to take any unused holiday during your notice period. If you have unused holiday at the end you’ve not taken, the business should pay you for those days you didn’t use. Holiday can be used at the end of the notice period to allow you to start a new role earlier if you so wish.Ask for an exit interviewMost businesses offer these now as a matter of course but make sure you have the chance to finish things well. Give the business feedback on your experience whilst you’ve been there.Make sure you have all your appraisal documents, and copies of any courses you’ve been on. Much easier to gather this information now, than trying to retrospectively back track once you’re 6 months into a new role.And finally, never speak badly of the business or the people. Now is not the time to air grievances and grudges. Leave well and look forward to your new challenge ahead.Good Luck! 

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  • Rec Logo
    Candidate
    UK Report on Jobs August 2021

    ​The latest UK Report on Jobs has been published and if you're a job seeker, it's a great read. All market data indicates that there's a growing demand for people, and starting salaries are rising. Most employers are reporting a shortage of good people available in the market. External factors such as a lack of workers due to Brexit, and low unemployment generally, makes for a tough operating environment if you are a hiring manager or recruiter.Job security is also a factor in the lack of candidates entering the market, and the end of the furlough scheme may alter the dynamic as we progress into the Autumn. You can download the report here and to discuss how the changing recruitment market may affect you, contact us here

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  • Personal Branding
    Candidate
    Personal Branding

    ​Personal BrandingThis week we’re talking about ‘Personal Branding’. It’s grown in importance over the last couple of years, and it’s something you should take notice of if you are hiring, job seeking, or looking to grow your presence online.So what is it?It’s defined as ‘The conscious and intentional effort to create and influence public perception of an individual by positioning them as an authority in their industry, elevating their credibility, and differentiating themselves from the competition, to ultimately advance their career, increase their circle of influence, and have a larger impact’ (Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_branding)And how do you go about it? We’ll offer some tips this week on small things that we’ve see our clients and candidates do well. Tip 1Before you embark on your personal branding journey, have a look at what you already have. What does your LinkedIn profile say about you? What other online presence do you have that people could find? Google yourself. What comes up?Do you have old CVs lurking on job boards?Have a ‘tidy up’ first and make sure your house is in order. Then you’re best placed to start to enhance it.Tip 2Once you’ve ‘tidied up’ your online presence, it’s time to start to enhance it.Firstly think about what you’re trying to achieve. Are you hiring, building a team and want to showcase your knowledge, employer brand and team/business culture? Or are you job seeking and want to show your expertise, capability and skills?Either of the above require some thought. And both will require you to ‘get active’ online. Start by commenting on other’s posts – offer some value, discussion and build a network that you actually converse with (rather than just watch!)Seen or read an article in your field? Share it and offer your point of view as curated content.Ask others to comment and support your posts. If you comment on other’s posts, they’re much more likely to participate in a discussion that you instigate.Stick with it. Engagement doesn’t come overnight and it takes determination to stick with it and keep posting.Tip 3Sounds really obvious, but building a personal brand is impossible unless you use your own voice.Copying or mimicking someone else never carries weight, and anyone who knows you will see right through it. Be authentic and be you.Some people story tell. Share a journey. What value or insight can you offer to help others by sharing your experiences? Others are more prescriptive by sharing narrative about specific things that have happened or are happening.What’s vital is that it’s genuine. You’ll only amplify your brand by sharing value and contributing to others. And they’ll reciprocate.Whether you’re active on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook or other social networks, you need to be consistently ‘there’ to be seen.Tip 4So, your profile looks good, you’re commenting on posts and creating and curating content. What’s next?Keep going. Go deeper. Who are the people, movements or organisations in your industry who get great engagement? Continually speak to others and provide value? They’re influencers and others will listen to them, follow them and engage with them.So follow them too, and pick up on trends or innovations in your industry, share the content and gain influencer buy in. Tagging someone or a business in a well-constructed post grabs their attention.Tip 5It’s a hard thing to separate your personal life and feelings, and your ‘business identity’ or ‘brand’. There’s nothing wrong with sharing insight into you. People love to get to know the whole person and by sharing personal thoughts, along with business dialogue just grows your authenticity.Growing a personal brand is a long term project, and there’s probably no end point. Before the growth of platforms, personal branding was reputation. What do you stand for, what are you know for?That has to be brought to the table time and time again.Want to know more? Contact us for our LinkedIn guide   

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  • Steve Mckiernan Mayors Award 2
    Candidate
    Steve McKiernan - Winner of Snaith Mayor's Award

    ​Steve McKiernan is a local hero!Winning an award is always a proud moment for anyone. And when it’s given as an accolade for services to the community it can mean even more. That’s the honour given to one of our consultants, Steve, who is the proud recipient of the Snaith Mayor’s Award for Services to the Community 20-21.Steve is a founding trustee of the town’s playing fields, a facility which provides a space for local football and sports teams to train, and for the community to hold events. Formerly the Chairman of the Snaith Junior Football Club, Steve was instrumental in setting up the buildings, pavilion and other facilities for locals and visitors to use.On winning the award, Steve told us ‘It was a real surprise to receive the news I’d been nominated for the award, and even more so to hear that I’d won. I got involved with the club when my son was 6, he’s now 25 and the club has gone from strength to strength.’Well done Steve, we're all really proud of you.

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  • UK Recruiter
    Client
    Personal Development - To qualify or not to qualify?

    ​Personal development is a hot topic, and there's an ongoing 'pressure' to ensure CPD is top of the agenda when it comes to appraisals, promotions and secondments.But what does it deliver? Caroline has written a guest blog for UK Recruiter on this very topic - read the article here.

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  • Helix Facebook Horiz
    Client
    The Power of Three - Everyone Matters. Clients. Candidates. Colleagues.

    ​The Power of Three – Clients, Candidates, ColleaguesEveryone Matters.Here at Expion, we believe that everyone matters. Our clients and candidates tell us that we offer an exceptional and consistent recruitment experience allowing you to benefit from our expert opinions and supporting you on every step of your recruitment journey.What sort of support do we offer?How our Colleagues SUPPORT our Candidates.We give CV advice. If your CV isn’t suitable for the role we’re talking to you about, we’ll tell you. And share with you a template and a step-by-step guide to make your CV shine.We give Interview Coaching. We really do. We have an inhouse Interview Coach, Liz, who works with our candidates before interview. She ensures everyone is prepared for interview, understands their ‘Red Thread’ and is able to articulate their experience well.We’ll ask about your other interviews. Not so we can pit others against you. But to share any knowledge we might have about that business. Give YOU an outsider’s view. As our candidate, you’ll have additional information to help you decide which role is best for you.We’ll meet you. We place you and you can expect a visit from us on site. It’s a proper check in, catch up and a way we can ensure we’ve done all we can to support you to settle in.There’s plenty more. But it’s only by working with us, you’ll get the real ‘us’. How our Colleagues SUPPORT our ClientsThat might sound obvious. But it’s about doing the extra and building a true partnership that we think makes us stand out.We’re your eyes and ears. Sensing how a candidate is feeling, where there’s a risk we might lose a valued candidate from the process and providing that insight to a client. We advise clients to include incoming team members in team communications, team lunches (Covid permitting) and even the Christmas party if it’s the festive period.We can let you know what others are doing in the market. If we’re proposing a retainer to you, we’ll provide insight into your competition for candidates. Often overlooked, this can make all the difference to developing the role proposition and landing that ‘gem’.We’re market savvy. As members of APSCo and Elite Leaders, we have access to market reports that others don’t. And as our client, we’ll share. All part of the service. How our Candidates SUPPORT our ColleaguesYou may ask what we mean by that. But it’s a partnership right?We can only be as good as the information we have. So the way to work well with a recruiter is easy. Be honest, be upfront and respond.Make sure we’ve got your up-to-date CV. You’d be surprised how many people have old CVs saved in job boards and then get upset when they apply with an old CV and think we’re in the wrong.Be honest about your salary expectations and don’t over-egg what you’re looking for. We’re open with our clients so be open with our colleagues to make sure there aren’t any surprises as the process goes on.Tell us what’s important to you and why you’re interested in the role. A ‘new challenge’ is very vanilla and 95% of candidates give this as a reason to look. It’s a good reason but make it specific if you’ve applied to a role and help our colleagues do their best work for you.And give us feedback. If you’re not interested in a role, let us know. We’d rather you select the role that’s right for you than feel cajoled into proceeding with a process that you don’t have your heart in. How Clients SUPPORT CandidatesWere you expecting that? Perhaps not, but the goal is to recruit the right person for your business isn’t it?A recruitment process is like dating. It's getting to know each other, putting in the work and showing your best bits. And for a business recruiting, it’s making sure your chosen candidate chooses YOU. I'm not talking about overinflating and over promising. But making sure they are as right for you as you are right for them. There's no one size fits all, but if you are interviewing, think about how the business portrays itself, who you meet during the interview process and how you feel around the people you'll be working with. Here are things I've seen businesses do well:Invite the candidate to a team lunch after the interview. It's more relaxed and makes them feel 'included' early onInclude incoming team members in team training and team building events prior to startingShare business updates, company information (where possible) so someone joining feels part of the business before they are 'in the building'Have a senior member of staff call to welcome them. Amazing how powerful that can beSend them some products (if you can) that they can share with friends and family. Makes the incoming employee proud of who they work for before they do! The list is endless, but it’s important not to overlook. If you’ve made an offer to someone and they have a 3 month notice period, that’s a long time for their current employer to try to persuade them to stay. And it's also a canny way of batting away any counteroffers. How our Clients SUPPORT our ColleaguesThey do. Perhaps we’re just lucky. But having a supportive client #makes all the difference to us and helps us to do our job better.You might be thinking, how can a client support a recruiter?Here’s what I’ve seen clients do wellBe open and transparent about the work you’re asking us to do. If there’s internal candidates, preferred candidates and other recruiters in the mix, just let us know. Allows us to be more open with the candidates we represent, and we in turn represent you more accuratelyOpen communication with the line manager. Hearing from the ‘horses’ mouth the nuances about the role and the attributes a candidate should possess helps to make the role ‘come alive’. And it gets us excited about finding candidates for the roleInvolving us in the process. Hearing our thoughts on candidates and why we think they should be considered. We get under the CV (and some CVs don’t necessarily make candidates shine). And some clients ask us to conduct the first stage interview with the line manager saving the client time and resources.Helping us get paid! You may chuckle but we don’t have any other income and providing PO numbers and making sure invoices are approved are vital to the lifeblood of any business. We love partnership. And we value it. Thank you to all the clients who offer us that ‘hand of friendship’. And to find out more about how what we do could SUPPORT you so get in touch

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  • Rec Logo
    Client
    UK Report on Jobs - April 2021 Update

    Recruitment Insight ​​The UK Report on Jobs was released today, produced by the REC and KPMG.For jobseekers, it makes for encouraging reading - permanent and temporary job vacancies rose sharply in March and vacancies expanded at the quickest rate since August 2018.For employers, increased market confidnce should start to unlock those who have been reluctant to consider a move, and salaries rising should play a factor in this. But employers also report a skills gap - construction, IT and retail all have incompatible supply and demand.What's your experience? Have you seen these trends play out, or noticed something different?UK Report on Jobs

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  • Laptop
    Candidate
    Can you 'Beat the 'Bot?'

    How to craft a CV to pass through Applicant Tracking Systems ​​Can you Beat the ‘Bot?We’re hearing more and more of our candidates tell us they struggle with applications made direct to organisations. Despite ‘having everything they were looking for’, the candidate receives a message they’re not progressing through the process.It’s a lose-lose all round.And the chances are the CV just hasn’t got through the computer screening.We've put together some hints and tips on how to optimise your CV for a role you suspect may pass through a ‘bot.Our first tip. Keep it simple.Remove any fancy formatting and symbols, logos etc. The software just can’t cope with it. Write a Word document that’s text focused and clear. Some ATS systems can’t process pdf files, and nor do they like graphs, charts and tables. Plain text files work really well for ATS software, but they do limit your formatting options.If you get through to interview, send through your formatted CV prior to interview which may be appropriate if you’re in a creative role such as a design or marketing role.Our second tip. Make your contact details visible. One thing we see many candidates do is to include name, address and contact details in the header or footer of the CV. For some people, it's an obvious place to tuck them away neatly but...Some ATS systems can’t process data in the header or footer so make sure you pop your contact details in the main body of your CV.  It’s suggested that up to 25% of candidates have contact details buried in the header or footer of their CV. Our third tip. Keywords. Oh don’t we love them?Not to be confused with buzzwords such as ‘proactive’ or ‘self-starter’, keywords highlight the soft and hard skills you have.Collect the keywords for the role you are applying for. Pick out the key terms and start to populate them into your CV. Now, there’s an optimal repetition of keywords and each algorithm will perform slightly differently. Some ATS systems will optimise the prevalence of the number of times a term appears, whereas others assign an estimated amount of experience for a particular skill based on its placement in the CV.In an ideal world, you optimise for both, but it’s a balancing act and after the ‘bot has done their bit, your CV will be read by a human so it still needs to read well.Our fourth tip. It’s a no to charts, graphs, images.‘The computer says NO’.You might be thinking about a certain David Walliams with that phrase, but the ‘bot will boot you away. As amazing as CVs look with fantastic formatting, it won’t get you through the door.Recruiters also prefer straightforward CVs. Part of our job is to gain the insight into our candidates and we add this into how we present you to our clients.And our clients say, 100% of the time, they just want the best person for the job.Our fifth tip. Simplify.Keep your bullet points simple. I think you’re getting the message by now. A solid circle, line or square works well, sadly emojis do not.Same with your design. Text where the ATS isn’t expecting it causes upset, as does irregular ordering of your experience. Always, always, most recent role first, and go back from there. Absolutely fine to ‘squeeze’ your earlier career (remember the 2 page rule) and back to keywords. You can overdo them which has the same effect – the computer says ‘no’.Good luck with your CV if you’re entering a process which involves a ‘bot. And take heart, these systems do work for many businesses and many, many candidates have successfully moved into roles when they’ve applied this way.There is tech available to help you…check out sites such as jobscan or zipjob that can be helpful.Remember, at the end of the day, humans make hiring decisions not computers. Need more advice on hiring, job searching or CV writing? Get in touch with us, we're happy to help.

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  • How to make your CV have impact
    Candidate
    Your CV - How to Create Impact

    ​ How to create impact with your CV ​Your CV is a sales document. Its purpose is to spark enough interest in you that the reader calls you for an interview. Your CV needs to stand out – you’re competing with other applicants and the pressures the reader has on his/her time. If you’re lucky, a 15 second scan is the most your CV will command (if it’s not read by computer…), and the majority of these precious seconds will be spent on the first page. Start with adding your contact details: list your mobile number, email address, LinkedIn profile and your home location. Consider layout – make it smart and easy to read. We advise a line under your name including the information above. Saves space and looks professional. Generate a Personal Statement/Career Profile. This takes thought. Think about who you are, what you offer and what you are looking for. Don’t fall into the trap of being very ‘high level’ with lots of descriptive words but no substance. Tailor your CV to the role you are applying for. Don’t think the reader will be searching for hints as to why you applied. ​​Qualifications – where to put them? Our rule of thumb – if your qualifications are directly relevant to the role or field you are in, make sure they are visible. You can also include them in your personal statement/profile e.g. CIPS qualified Procurement Manager with 15+ years experience in the FMCG industry…. A relevant degree or advanced qualifications can also be included e.g. Degree qualified Senior Technical Manager with in excess of 10 years’ experience working with the UK retailers including M&S, Tesco and Asda. Include other relevant qualifications if they add value and list courses attended/other qualifications towards the end of the CV. Don’t list every piece of training you’ve ever attended, it’s not necessary. And if you’re not qualified in your field, state what you DO HAVE…e.g. 8 years’ experience turning underperforming brands into market leaders within 18 months. Responsible for successful new product launches gaining 15% market share in 12 weeks. ​Experience. Important part of a CV. And it’s EASY to waffle. Please don’t. We strongly advocate a brief description of the business you work for/worked for – what they do/did, key customers and products. Let your CV tell the full story, and allow the recruiter to visualize the context of where you work. It’s likely the reader won’t have time to Google your employers and if your CV is read by a recruiter or HR Manager new to the sector, they won’t yet have detailed knowledge. And if you are the Hiring Manager and there’s little or no description, some candidates ‘hide’ these nuggets of information in the description of the role. Look for key words and phrases to gather the information you need to decide to meet. Brevity prevails when we get to experience. List 3-4 key responsibilities and 3-4 key achievements for each role. Avoid a ‘copy and paste’ of your job description, it’s not IMPACTFUL, we want to know HOW GOOD you were at your job. ​Previous/Early career – how to position this on a CV? Many people struggle with this, and simply add, and add and ADD to their CV. Candidates worry that leaving something out may jeopardise their chances of an interview. I get it. It’s part of what made you what you are today but listing responsibilities from your first job in 2000 (or before) isn’t going to add value. It will DETRACT. ‘Squeeze’ down the CV. Listing early roles with employer and job title will still show progression but without dragging the CV onto page 3. And here’s the elephant in the room. Age. Candidates who are later in their career worry about this a great deal. CVs no longer include DOB (and recruiters remove them anyway) but it’s not necessary to list dates for all of your early career roles. Simply pop ‘Early career includes’ and list. And move on. ​​Having spent the week talking about what to include on your CV we thought we’d include some things to leave out. Date of birth – please. It’s not required and we remove it anyway if we represent you. But if your CV is on a job board with DOB, address and a few other details, identity theft is very easy for those who know how. So please protect yourself. Marital status, number of children, where you were born (yes really) aren’t things an employer needs to know. Reasons for leaving. Yes, we see them and they’re never good. Don’t apologise if you were made redundant. It’s life. Explain briefly at interview and focus on the reasons you want to join a business. Playing golf ‘badly’. This is our number 1 hate. We are yet to be convinced it’s funny. Think about your personal interests if you decide to include them. What do they say about YOU? Have you raised money for charity, are you a member of a club or society? Do you train regularly? Much, much better than stating you’re not good at something or making a joke. References. Bit of a GDPR nightmare and not required. Once you’re offered a job, send discretely with permission to your future employer. And please, please ask someone to proofread. We've just opened a CV of a chef. He’s in charge a full kitchen BRIDGE would you believe?​A CV critique is just part of the service we offer to our candidates. If you need support with your CV and you work in the sectors we cover, then please get in touchfor more information - we're just a phone call away.

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  • Businesses who are hiring or creating jobs
    Candidate
    Who's Hiring?

    ​ Who's hiring in the UK food manufacturing industry? ​Plenty of business are hiring right now. And for those who have lost their jobs in the Food & FMCG arena, we thought we’d round up some of the businesses who we’ve seen are investing and hiring. We know it’s tough out there to find a new role, but we thought this knowledge would be helpful.Not all these businesses will have vacancies right now, but they may have coming up.Our advice to you would be to make sure you sign up for any job alerts and follow the business on LinkedIn. See if there’s anyone you know working for a business of interest to you and connect with them. Get some hints, tips and knowledge before you apply.Remember – preparation shows. Get ahead. There are more candidates in the candidate pool, but it doesn’t mean they are more appropriate. So, don’t be put off. And if you have a link to a business already, you are normally then best placed to see any vacancies first.So here’s our round up of some of the businesses getting active with their cash and their jobs.Cadburys are moving manufacturing to the UK with a £15m investment in Bourneville:https://londonlovesbusiness.com/cadbury-to-move-from-germany-to-uk-with-15m-investment/Biscuit sales are booming in Northumbria and are investing 6 figures to expand production of their gluten free products – great news for anyone who’s a consumer:https://www.business-live.co.uk/retail-consumer/northumbrian-fine-foods-make-six-19752243ECD are benefitting from part of £100m investment in the Tech Valleys in South Wales, and it’s more than just food businesses that gain the grants available:https://www.blaenau-gwent.gov.uk/en/story/news/tech-valleys-manufacturer-of-dried-foods-and-nutrients-amongst-beneficiaries-from-new-investment-gra/PFF, who normally make packaging for supermarket products, have expanded into supporting the NHS and healthcare workers with PPE:https://bdaily.co.uk/articles/2021/02/15/northern-food-packaging-firm-launches-ppe-division-after-creating-100-new-jobsAnd First Milk are dividing a £12.5m investment between plants in Cumbria and South Wales:https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/03/01/First-Milk-invests-12.5m-in-cheese-and-whey-processingBottling business MEG are ploughing investment into their South Derbyshire plant, creating 150 jobs:https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/03/01/150-jobs-to-be-created-at-new-bottling-plantPukka Pies have invested almost £5m in their pant in Leicestershire and allowed them to invest in NPD and enter the Vegan market:https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/03/01/Pie-maker-Pukka-announces-4.5m-Syston-bakery-investmentWyke Farms have created a new export centre, and also heightened their green credentials:https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/02/19/Cheese-maker-Wyke-Farms-posts-record-salesAnd Mackie’s Crisps have invested in Perthshire:https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/02/15/Mackie-s-Crisps-invests-750-000-in-vegetable-crisps-factorySedamyl (a former Tate & Lyle site) are creating 75 jobs in Selby:https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/02/08/Sedamyl-80m-investment-in-Selby-plant-to-create-75-jobsBranston have brought in a new MD to support a £12m investmenthttps://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Article/2021/02/05/Potato-firm-Branston-appoints-MD-to-support-12m-investmentAnd these are just the stories from the last few weeks.If you’d like to know more about hiring in this market, let us know – we’re happy to help. 

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  • Francesca F1 Picture
    Candidate
    Formula 1 - My Passion

    ​My passion: I’ve been a major follower of F1 since a child says Francesca LoughreyFollowing Formula 1 helps Francesca Loughrey, Associate Director at Expion Search & Selection, switch off at the weekend. No-one in my family is into motorsports, so they were surprised when I quickly became hooked after I stumbled across a Formula 1 race on the TV at the age of 15.  At first, I enjoyed the excitement of seeing fearless drivers race the fastest cars in the world, often pulling risky manoeuvres which sometimes led to glory (and others to disaster).  Over the years I had become more interested in the strategic element of the sport, finding a fascination in the making of the right or wrong call when to re-fuel (when it was still permitted) or stop for tyre replacement and how this could make or break a driver’s race.  I’ve followed some great British drivers over the years, cheering on Damon Hill, Jenson Button and then Lewis Hamilton. I’m a huge Lewis Hamilton fan – seeing him battle his way past most drivers on the track from the beginning of his career - truly inspirational. In 2018, I was lucky enough to attend the British Grand Prix and thought he was set for a home victory when he qualified on pole; unfortunately, he got spun in his first lap landing him right at the back. However, the real inspiration that he is, Lewis managed to overtake nearly every car on the track that day, finishing second place. It was a fantastic show of true fighting spirit. I owe a lot to Formula 1, for me, it has been so much more than just being a sport or just a hobby for the weekend. It’s been a way of keeping me inspired and motivated. Lewis’s motto is to ”never give up”This is something I try to live by when faced with difficult challenges in life. Determination and hard work are things you need to succeed in the recruitment industry I’ve worked in for 17 years now; Lewis and Formula 1 provide that motivation I need to keep achieving the best.Luckily for me, I have been fortunate enough to tie my passion for Formula 1 with my working life moving into Automotive recruitment 13 years ago, and I’ve stayed in this sector ever since.  The continually evolving technology fascinates me in general, especially with rules tightening to reduce the environmental impact of transport. It’s impressive to see technologies first developed by Formula 1 being transferred to the types of commercial vehicles that my clients and candidates work with. Commercial vehicle operators are under more pressure than ever to increase efficiencies of their fleet, and I love discussing this with them – often finding they have a shared love of motorsport.About Francesca LoughreyFrom starting as a stand-alone specialist recruiter 13 years ago, focusing on the automotive industry, Francesca has grown a highly successful recruitment business with a team of recruiters who deliver tailored resourcing campaigns to organisations across the UK. Believing in success due to specialist, in-depth knowledge of the automotive and engineering markets and aconsultative approach, Francesca ensures that the best candidates are matched with relevant positions.​For more information on roles in Automotive, Logistics & Distribution please get in touch with us at Expion - we're happy to chat all things recruitment and Formula 1... 

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  • Hiring
    Client
    Latest trends in Medical Devices and Pharmaceutical Recruitment

    ​Spotlight on the Medical Devices and Pharmaceutical market.What gives us our #expertopinion in Medical Devices & Pharmaceutical Recruitment? Recruiting into the regulated sector has always been challenging but #Covid has accelerated things.Here’s the state of the market at the moment in January 2021There’s still a skills gap. In demand are people with experience in Quality, Regulatory, Validation, R&D and QPs. Good candidates are in demand and employers need to be creative in how they attract talent.To recruit effectively, a well-established network is vital. Having established relationships with a broad range of people brings knowledge, recommendations and credibility. All important for an effective recruitment process in a market where candidate supply is dwindling.Hiring Managers are well qualified, capable people, but they’re not recruiters. To successfully hire, you need a partner who can support you, whilst you do your day job which you’re brilliant at.Trends we are seeing are salaries rising as demand for candidates grows, and candidates requesting clear career paths once established in post. Commitment from the employer to employee about personal growth, and flexibility to entice a move.Growth in businesses where there is spare manufacturing capacity – we’ve already seen this with one of our key clients, Wockhardt, who are manufacturing the Covid vaccine.We expect to see greater hiring in the supply chain, not just as the vaccine is rolled out, but lessons are learned once the initial surge is through and supply chain security is advanced.Emerging businesses as new technologies are developed, rolled out and market adoption increases, along with an appetite for investment and acquisition.For more insight into recruiting into Medical Devices and Pharmaceuticals, please contact Richard Clegg or a member of the Expion team - we're really happy to help whether you're a client or a candidate.

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  • UK Recruiter
    Candidate
    Tales from the Covid mist

    ​Our director, Caroline Vooght, is a guest blogger for UK Recruiter, a well respected source of information for the recruitment industry. Here she shares her insights into the experiences of many working within the UK Food & FMCG manufacturing industry during Covid.UK Recruiter - Tales from the Covid Mist

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  • Pharma Jobs
    Client
    Pharma recruitment during Covid

    ​All manufacturers have had to adapt during Covid, and the Pharmaceuticals industry is no exception. Richard Clegg gives his insight into how the changes have affected the industry, and what the future holds.Pharma Jobs - Pharma recruitment during Covid

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  • Ir35 Recruitment
    Candidate
    All you need to know about IR35 changes

    ​If you are a business hiring contractors or you are self-employed, you will have heard about IR35. It’s essential for contractors, recruiters, and employers to understand the rules around off-payroll working, also known as IR35, as new changes come into effect in April 2021.Below, we have put together some answers to frequently asked questions that will help you understand more about IR35 and the changes to come.What is IR35?Back in 2000, HMRC introduced the ‘off-payroll working rules’ (IR35) to tackle ‘disguised’ employment. This is when a contractor is essentially working as an employee but taking advantage of the tax efficiency of working through a limited company. If a contractor is caught doing so, they will be required to pay any tax and national insurance (NI) due as if they were an employee – resulting in a significantly bigger tax bill than usual.The introduction of the new IR35 rules was designed to assess whether a contractor is genuine rather than a ‘disguised’ employee, to ensure they pay the correct amount of tax.IR35 tends to apply when the following conditions are met:The individual performs services for a client.The work is provided under a contract involving an intermediary.The services are provided under an agreement between the client and contractor, meaning the contractor is classed as an employee.What is the Status Determination Statement?A status determination statement (SDS) is a comprehensive statement from the client which declares a contractor’s deemed employment status following an IR35 assessment, detailing reasons for reaching this conclusion.Under the new IR35 rules, the employer (referred in the law as the ‘end client’) will be made accountable for any IR35 judgements. Previously, this determination was left to the contractor to decide. Now it is up to the end-client to choose using reasonable care and share this, in addition to any reasoning behind the decision, to all parties in the supply chain.End-clients must take ‘reasonable care’ when making a status determination decision. HMRC has stated blanket decisions (i.e. that an entire workforce is caught by the off-payroll rules) does not constitute ‘reasonable care’ – and is of bad practice.According to the new rules, all clients must demonstrate that they have assessed IR35 correctly but may be expected to take a higher degree of care by larger companies that have more significant resources to contribute to compliance. Should the client fail to provide ‘reasonable care’, they will inherit liability, whether they are the relevant ‘fee payer’.What’s considered in an IR35 decision?IR35 will affect contractors who work in the same way as an employee of their end client but get paid via an intermediary – (i.e. their own limited company). Determinations are dependent on several criteria:Control –this is often grouped with ‘supervision’ and ‘direction’ referring to the level of control the contractor has over the work executed. A contractor must not be under the direction or control of the client business. They must have the freedom to carry out the contract, using their expertise, as they see fit. If you are in charge of how your contract is completed and work according to your schedule, this suggests you have the necessary control over what you do, leaving you outside IR35.The Right of Substitution –this relates to the services of the person with significant control (PSC). It is the right of a contractor to send a replacement to perform services for the client on their behalf. Typically, the PSC selects a contractor on the criteria and agreement of the client (usually the sole employee of the PSC). However, for an assignment to fall out of scope, the business must be willing to accept a substitute contractor (through the same PSC) should the originally selected contractor not be able to complete part of the work. The business isn’t allowed to interview the replacement contractor and must accept the choice of the PSC. For a contract to fall outside IR35 rules, it should specify that a substitute contractor can complete work on your behalf.Mutuality of Obligation –this refers to a shared obligation between the worker and the work provider (client). The contractor mustn’t do any other work for the business, and the company is not obliged to provide additional work outside the contract, nor on completion. This constitutes a contract of employment. If your agreement states that you can’t take on different clients while working for your current client, it could mean you fall outside IR35 rules.If you pass the above criteria, you will be classed as ‘outside’ of IR35 rules and can continue to invoice and pay yourself through your own limited company. If you are deemed ‘inside’ IR35 and HMRC declare an employment relationship, tax and National Insurance will be deducted from earnings and any liability for missing tax is the client’s responsibility.Who’s affected by the IR35 changes? And how?Firstly, the legislation applies to medium and large businesses. If you are classed as a small business with less than 50 employees, typically under £10m turnovers, these changes don’t apply.The changes in IR35 will not necessarily affect the self-employed, sole traders and umbrella companies. HMRC decided that instead of the contractor, the end-client will determine their IR35 status with the fee-payer picking up the IR35 liability. This means some umbrella companies will be affected if they manage the accounts for contractors and pay them as a PSC. You may be affected by IR35 if you are:a worker who provides their services through their intermediarya client who receives services from a worker through their intermediaryan agency providing workers’ services through their intermediaryWill IR35 changes continue to go ahead?This is the most frequently asked question, and our answer is yes, we believe so. The changes made to the off-payroll rules were due to come into effect on 6 April 2020. This has since been delayed until April 2021 to help businesses deal with the economic impact of COVID-19. The delay is not a sign of cancellation with the changes being made law in July 2020. This means that HMRC would have to apply to challenge the law for the changes to be cancelled.What happens if my contract runs post-April 2021?You should proceed ahead as though the legislation is already in place and undertake a full status determination statement. To do so, you need to make sure suitably qualified people carry out the SDS within the client business. The role and activities taking place must be thoroughly interrogated to make sure the answers given are answered correctly and in full as this is key criteria for HMRC. The status determination must be communicated throughout the recruitment supply chain.Do you require further help?With the changes to IR35 going ahead in April 2021, we can provide you with a solution that removes the risk of an HMRC challenge through a compliant status determination tool.To discover more, please do not hesitate tocontact our friendly professionalstoday or make sure to follow us onLinkedin,FacebookandTwitterfor frequent updates and advice.​​

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  • Interview Preparation Recruitment
    Candidate
    How to prepare for interviews post COVID19

    ​The COVID-19 pandemic has turned our world upside down and in particular the world of work. In its wake, it has caused uncertainty for the future and will undoubtedly change the recruitment process forever.While the lockdown has seen us all go through a raft of emotions, it has also been an opportunity to reassess what we want from our future and in particular our careers. Regardless of whether you were furloughed or not during the pandemic, the questions you will be asked in future interviews might look very different.Whether you’re looking for a new job or wanting to jump from one career path to another, we have put together some potential questions that interviews may include post-COVID-19.“How did you spend your time in lockdown during the pandemic”.If you’ve been furloughed, we understand it can be easy to sit back and binge-watch a Netflix series or if you have dependents having to undertake care duties can hamper any grand plans for self-development.What employers will be listening out for here is how you managed to make use of this time productively whether this is reading books, exercising, working on professional skills, homeschooling the kids (leadership and mentoring) or listening to podcasts while doing housework.“What did you do to support your employer during the Pandemic”.If you’ve still been working during this period. Consider what you have done to help your employer navigate the situation.Think about how you added value and where you stepped up to deal with challenges, and how you might have supported your colleagues through this too.A new employer will be listening out for cues you are proactive, can take the lead, are reliable and can be trusted.“Tell me a time during lockdown you surprised yourself”.Behavioural interview questions such as “tell me about a time when”, are used to get to know an individual’s personality/character and can be asked in both negative and positive ways, for example:Positive – “tell me about a time when you reached a goal.”Negative – “tell me about a time when you failed at work.”You might have found juggling work and homeschooling quite easy. Or you might have developed a new skill, hobby or done something else impressive.If you aren’t already, using ajournalis a great way to keep on track of those small wins during this period and allow you the opportunity to look back and reflect on your achievements. Journals are usually assumed to be a way of just scribbling your thoughts onto a piece of paper. This is an important feature, however, not the full use or potential. A journal allows you to write down daily goals, targets, wins and lessons learned.“Due to the pandemic, the talent pool is a lot more saturated, explain to us why we should choose you to fill the position over the competition”.This is your moment to sell yourself, and if you don’t take the opportunity, someone else will. This question is always a challenging one, so make sure this is one you prepare for. Consider what is it that makes you stand out, what value do you bring to the organisations you work for, what knowledge and expertise can you bring, what are you like personally?A great example of what employers look for in an employee is their commitment and accountability for your professional development. The world of work is changing, even more rapidly than pre-COVID-19 so make a commitment to yourself to keep learning. If you need some guidance as to where to start, check out our recent blog, in which we rounded up a range offree online resourcesto begin your learning journey.“Describe a difficult situation in which you came out better on the other side”.This is a question that was often used before the pandemic. Now we can use COVID-19 to our advantage to answer this question. By working on being productive at home and working on professional and personal development, you will be able to come up with many answers for the question. For example:“The recent pandemic disrupted my day to day life immensely, but I decided to use the extra time I had after being furloughed efficiently. I allowed myself set times for relaxing and watching my favourite series but filled my days with developing my skills for my professional future. For example, on my LinkedIn, you can find the certifications for online courses I undertook such as…..”​At Expion, we’d love to hear how you’re working on productivity and what you’re learning right now.If you’re an employer, what questions are you now asking?Tweet us @expionUK.

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  • Listening Skills In Recruitment
    Candidate
    The real reasons for leaving a role and listening skills

    ​I’ve been in recruitment since Ant and Dec were in Byker Grove (well almost!) and of course I’ve had my fair share of conversations with candidates about their reasons for leaving their current employer (RFL). Nothing new there. Recently, though, I’ve seen a real shift in the openness being offered by candidates, and it’s this interesting change that brought me to write this.As a recruitment ‘newbie’ in the noughties, I was taught to question and query every RFL given to me. Make sure you REALLY know, I was told. Ask again in a different way, ask for references…the reasons go on and on. As a youngster, I probably asked too much, was too intrusive – in the wrong ways.Over the years, I’ve refined what I ask, how I ask it and always been very conscious of my audience. It would have been unheard of for a candidate to give anything but a standard response (new challenge, lack of opportunities), until recently, when I spoke with a candidate with a different story to share.I’d received a CV from a male candidate, experienced in his field and with a wealth of knowledge (assuming the CV to be correct!). A few years ago, he opened up about how one of his close friends lost their teenage son suddenly. Overnight. Just like that. He explained how this event had had such a profound impact on him, he lost his way at work, and couldn’t focus or gain satisfaction from the field he’d been working in for many years. This led to a cycle of depression, and he eventually left his role, took some time out and subsequently found another position with a similar business to the one he’d left. Should be the end of the story, shouldn’t it?Not so. The reason that he was talking to me was that he’d not been able to perform to the standards the new business required, and he’d been let go from his new role after a year. I felt for him. And I admired his approach to be open and honest with me, someone he’d never met and didn’t know.It got me thinking. There’s plenty of talk now about mental health and I strongly suspect that had this happened now, he’d have had access to more support than has ever been offered.But the real change I felt was that as a recruiter, we have such a duty to support candidates, whatever their reasons for moving on. Not everyone has a CV stuffed full of market-leading achievements, an array of blue-chip businesses they’ve worked for, and a first-class degree. That’s not how life works.I was humbled by his experience and the pain he’d been through. I felt compelled to make sure that I think carefully about how and why we ask about reasons for moving on. And to bear in mind that everyone has a back story and things going on that no-one knows about. My approach is now different. The candidate in question will absolutely secure a new role – he’s good at what he does. I wish him well.What have I changed, and how can we, as recruiters, show the empathy and respect for individuals we should, while still hitting the never-ending targets (whether in house or agency). My thoughts are as follows:Take time. Listen to what people have to tell you, rather than simply listen to reply.Have an open mind. The experience people have shapes them, and everyone has something to contribute.Challenge perceptions with hiring managers. Gaps in CVs, unusual RFL, changes in direction all mean something to the individual, and there could be a real opportunity for someone in a business if the ‘norm’ is challenged.Think like a candidate. How do they feel? Looking for a role can be extremely humbling.Give an amazing candidate experience. As recruiters, we’re ambassadors for our clients and hiring managers, and we need to make them stand out.And so my final thoughts are this as a recruiter. We deal with people, not in people. And we have an opportunity to leave an impression on our candidates as they do with us.In the words of the late Maya Angelou (American Poet):I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.Author, Caroline Vooght – Business Unit Director​​​I’m an experienced recruiter with over 20 years in the industry and a specialism for recruiting in the food/FMCG industry. I’ve grown and developed teams and love supporting others.Source: https://ukrecruiter.co.uk/2020/02/28/listening-skills/

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